168 Things

Beyond the totalitarian brand - an interview with Lazar Dzamic

September 22, 2020 Paul Kitcatt and Chalice Croke Season 1 Episode 15
168 Things
Beyond the totalitarian brand - an interview with Lazar Dzamic
Chapters
168 Things
Beyond the totalitarian brand - an interview with Lazar Dzamic
Sep 22, 2020 Season 1 Episode 15
Paul Kitcatt and Chalice Croke

Lazar Dzamic is one of the leading strategic thinkers in digital marketing - or indeed, any kind of marketing. We worked together at Kitcatt Nohr Alexander Shaw; from there he went to Google; and now he's home in Serbia, for a while. He recently published 'The Definitive Guide to Strategic Content Marketing', (with Justin Kirby, publ. Kogan Page) a book that fully delivers on its title. I spoke with him via a video link between Balham and Belgrade.
We discussed the future of brands, in the light of the continuing development of digital technology, and of the economic consequences of the pandemic. His observations are pithy, thoughtful and challenging. He picks up on themes from the previous podcast in this series, and develops them, urging brand owners to do the necessary work to move away from 'the glamorous monologue' of old-school advertising thinking (you'd think by now they'd have understood, but no), and enjoy the excitement and freedom the digital revolution offers them. 
It's more than thought-provoking - he also gives practical advice on what to do, right now. Brand owners and agencies alike will find this interview stimulating and useful.


Show Notes

Lazar Dzamic is one of the leading strategic thinkers in digital marketing - or indeed, any kind of marketing. We worked together at Kitcatt Nohr Alexander Shaw; from there he went to Google; and now he's home in Serbia, for a while. He recently published 'The Definitive Guide to Strategic Content Marketing', (with Justin Kirby, publ. Kogan Page) a book that fully delivers on its title. I spoke with him via a video link between Balham and Belgrade.
We discussed the future of brands, in the light of the continuing development of digital technology, and of the economic consequences of the pandemic. His observations are pithy, thoughtful and challenging. He picks up on themes from the previous podcast in this series, and develops them, urging brand owners to do the necessary work to move away from 'the glamorous monologue' of old-school advertising thinking (you'd think by now they'd have understood, but no), and enjoy the excitement and freedom the digital revolution offers them. 
It's more than thought-provoking - he also gives practical advice on what to do, right now. Brand owners and agencies alike will find this interview stimulating and useful.